Women Leaders In Tech Discuss Mobile in Work, Life And Play

Women Leaders Discuss Mobile in Work, Life, Play

Women Leaders Discuss Mobile in Work, Life, Play

Mobile technology is inescapable. Rent a car and a helpful assistant is curbside with a device that spits out a rental agreement. Fancy that ceramic art at the outdoor show? No problem, the artist processes the credit card transaction on her phone.

Mobile devices are transforming the way women use the Internet. While an Ericsson Consumer Lab report shows that women have been heavy users of communications services on mobile phones for years, more recently women have started using their devices for daily life-related behaviors and the trend is being frontlined by women leaders in tech. When a phone is such an important facet in your business, it’s important to choose the right device and service. T-mobile’s cell phone comparisons break down the features and benefits of each device to help you choose the right one.

Women Leaders In Tech: Women and Mobile

LC Neal is a poster child for women leaders in tech and she manages sales, marketing and finance for a multi-million dollar commercial farm. The company ships tropical foliage throughout the US, Canada and the Caribbean, and purchases materials globally. Like many women, Neal uses mobile technology at work, home, and play. Neal’s story illustrates how mobile technology enhances her busy life.

“At the farm, I use an iPhone almost exclusively, and constantly,” she says. “One of the most valuable sales tools I have is photography — we grow and sell color, after all. Each week, I walk through our shade houses and greenhouses to conduct inventory and capture images of crops I know will generate some mass market interest,” Neal said. “I frame and present representative photography of ready crops. They have to look irresistible, and I do it from a device that’s 4 ½-inches by 2 ½-inches wide.”

I frame and present representative photography of ready crops. They have to look irresistible, and I do it from a device that’s 4 ½-inches by 2 ½-inches wide. – LC Neal

Neal runs her office PC from her iPhone. “I figure profit margins on the fly in order to offer volume sales pricing, record operational and maintenance problems that we need to fix, and I can listen to music while I do it.”

“I’m on an HP laptop and a Kindle Fire, also constantly. I run several websites not associated with my day job. I’m hands on as a writer and editor in chief at Fictionique.”

Neal’s Kindle is the last device to power down in the evenings. She reads something purely escapist before she goes to sleep. In the morning, she uses it to check overnight emails and the headlines from Bloomberg Business Week, the New York Times and the Miami Herald.

Investment executive Sonja Brown highlighted the ways she uses mobile technology to simplify her life at home and work in a Venturebeat column. Brown mentioned that mobile devices help make work and family life seamless. “Like many executives, my job is 24/7, and I am always plugged in,” she told Venturebeat. “I embrace this mesh of work and personal time versus setting strict barriers to separate the two.”

Mobile for Communications and Crisis

At the farm, Neal opined how mobile technology aids in previously unimaginable ways.

“We really are safer in a very dangerous environment,” she offered. “For instance, during hurricane season, we are all under tremendous stress. If a storm hits, we have a decent chance of having communication with each other and emergency personnel.

“We have greenhouse alarms that tell us everything from whether we have an intruder to whether we’ve lost a roof in a storm,” Neal continued. “It gives us time to prevent a robbery or get exposed crops under cover before the sun fries them. That ability can and has saved us hundreds of thousands of dollars in loss and damage.”

Women Leaders in Tech: Career Options for Women?

Whether delivering a pink orchid to a Toronto wedding or making trades coast to coast, mobile technology is here to stay. Is this resulting in more women aiming for a tech-mobile career? The answer is somewhat indecisive right now.

While women use technology often as much as their male peers, the percentage of females entering the world of technology as a career has been declining.

While women use technology often as much as their male peers, the percentage of females entering the world of technology as a career has been declining, notes The New York Times. Women earn just 12 percent of computer science degrees, down from 37 percent in 1984. “It’s a significant disconnect, given how women embrace technology, reports the Times article.

However, there are grassroots groups trying to change those declining numbers. Organizations like Girls Who Code steer young women toward careers in technology, aiming to educate, inspire, and equip young women with the skills and resources to pursue academic and career opportunities in computing fields.